The Lisa: Apple’s Most Influential Failure – CHM:

Despite the Lisa’s failure in the marketplace, it holds a key place in the history of the GUI and PCs more generally as the first GUI-based computer to be released by a personal computer company.

The real secrets of iOS and accessibility – Six Colors:

There’s a joke I tell a lot: if you encounter an article whose headline includes the words “secret features” and “iOS”, chances are you’re about to be taken on a whirlwind tour of your phone’s accessibility settings. “Did you know you could….?” Or. “Buried deep in iOS settings, you’ll find…”

Truth is, these aren’t secret features at all; they’re just unfamiliar to people whose eyes, ears and hands operate in a typical way. And these “secrets” are rarely written about, even in comprehensive coverage of iOS. “Invisible” might be a more honest way to describe these tools.

Apple’s products make Accessibility a first-class feature, though often below the bar of easy discoverability.

Cryptex: how a custom iPhone is changing macOS updates – The Eclectic Light Company:

Big Sur brought us the immutable boot volume, signed and sealed, with the SSV. This makes it almost impossible for malicious software to change anything in the System, as it’s a snapshot with every last bit verified using its tree of hashes. Its downside is that making wanted changes to update macOS or any components on the SSV is cumbersome: changes have to be written to the System volume, a snapshot made, the tree of hashes rebuilt and verified against Apple’s setting for that build of macOS, and macOS rebooted from the new snapshot.

Initially, the solution for apps like Safari, security data such as that for XProtect, and other components like Rosetta 2 that need to be installed separately from macOS, was to store them on the Data volume, where they can only be protected by SIP. That’s how Big Sur and Monterey worked, but this started to change in late versions of Monterey (in 12.6.1, if not before), and Ventura, with the introduction of the cryptex.

Cryptexes first appeared on Apple’s customised iPhone, its Security Research Device, which uses them to load a personalised trust cache and a disk image containing corresponding content. Without the cryptex, engineering those iPhones would have been extremely difficult.

MarsEdit 5 – Powerful web publishing from your Mac.:

Browser-based interfaces are slow, clumsy, and require you to be online just to use them. Web browsers are wonderful for reading articles, but not for creating them. If you’re writing for the web, you need a desktop blog editor. And if you’re lucky enough to have a Mac, nothing is more powerful, or more elegant than MarsEdit.

Marsedit is such a great app for interacting with weblogs. On every other platform I’ve touched – Windows, Linux, even iOS and iPadOS – I have searched for something similar, or even close, and fallen short.

My only wish in relation to this is that there was an iOS/iPadOS version so I can keep up my workflow across my more personal devices. It would be an insta-buy for me, and I’m sure many others.

Neuromancer: Miles Teller Eyed For New Apple+ Sci-Fi Series: Exclusive – The Illuminerdi:

Daring Fireball: Report: Amazon Alexa Is a ‘Colossal Failure’ on Pace to Lose $10 Billion This Year:

The thing about Siri is that it was always at heart about making Apple’s platforms more accessible. Siri is there to make iPhones, iPads, Macs, Apple TVs, Apple Watches, and even AirPods better. And Apple isn’t losing money on any of those. Siri will serve the same purpose on future platforms from Apple, too. Apple’s investments in Siri are part and parcel investments in their OS strategy for everything they make.

Contra Chrome

October 4, 2022

In Contra Chrome, Leah carefully charts this road and its terrain in a funny and easily accessible way. In webcomic form, she documents how over the last decade, Google’s browser has become a threat to user privacy and the democratic process itself.

With her meticulous rearrangement of Scott McCloud‘s Google-commissioned Chrome comic from 2008, she delivers what she calls „a much-needed update“. Laying bare the inner workings of the controversial browser, she creates the ultimate guide to one of the world‘s most widely used surveillance tools:

Contra Chrome – a webcomic – How Google’s browser became a threat to privacy and democracy

org2blog vs MarsEdit

September 20, 2022

I’ll probably update this post over time as I do more work with both…

I’ve loved MarsEdit for years as the best blog editor, through generational shifts in what blogging meant and how it fit into the landscape. It is, however, a Mac only tool, which in itself isn’t bad but it doesn’t include iPad or iPhone… And it doesn’t expose it’s moving parts to be extended (I’d love to know how to make emacs the external editor for marsedit for example.)

org2blog as an extension of orgmode makes it unique, as it leverages a format and style I adore, and uses barely marked up plaintext… So I’ll be seeing if I can make Shortcuts which can take a subtree or orgmode file and post to WordPress out of band from emacs itself.

The Steve Jobs Archive

September 8, 2022

The Steve Jobs Archive:

From: Steve Jobs, sjobs@apple.com

To: Steve Jobs, sjobs@apple.com

Date: Thursday, September 2, 2010 at 11:08PM

I grow little of the food I eat, and of the little I do grow I did not breed or perfect the seeds.

I do not make any of my own clothing.

I speak a language I did not invent or refine.

I did not discover the mathematics I use.

I am protected by freedoms and laws I did not conceive of or legislate, and do not enforce or adjudicate.

I am moved by music I did not create myself.

When I needed medical attention, I was helpless to help myself survive.

I did not invent the transistor, the microprocessor, object oriented programming, or most of the technology I work with.

I love and admire my species, living and dead, and am totally dependent on them for my life and well being.

Sent from my iPad

Steve Jobs is one of my heroes… Not a saint by any means, but someone who really, truly, worked to make it easier for everyone to create and inspire others. I look forward to exploring the archives more.

In-app browsers that act as keyloggers – Six Colors:

Krause’s tool lets anyone investigate what might be leaking through in-app browsers. Apps that use Apple’s SafariViewController are all pretty safe, but apps like TikTok, Instagram, Facebook Messenger, and Facebook are using their own in-app browsers that modify pages with JavaScript.

TikTok, in particular, is monitoring all keyboard inputs and taps. “From a technical perspective, this is the equivalent of installing a keylogger on third party websites,” Krause writes.

Any program that forces me to use the in-app browser gets deleted by me.

via Six Colors